Estate Planning Awareness Week: Does Your Plan Need A Checkup?

Less than half of adults in the United States have a will or living trust according to a 2017 survey by caring.com. Estate planning is far too important to ignore. The Law Office of Jennifer Nixon wants to work with you to:

  • protect your children;
  • ensure your property and finances are distributed according to your wishes;
  • properly layout your wishes in a health care directive; and,
  • name an agent to manage your finances through a power of attorney.

Planning for a future without you can be hard to imagine. But without planning, that future can be a mess for your children, spouse or other relatives to take care of after you’re gone. It’s important

to work with an estate planning attorney anytime a big life change occurs – such as having children or getting married – as well as reviewing your documents on a regular basis.

Contact an attorney to set up an appointment today, and learn more about estate planning below.

History

National Estate Planning Awareness Week was created in 2008 by Congress on the third week of October every year to encourage people to understand the what, why, and how of estate planning.

This year National Estate Planning Awareness Week falls on Oct. 16-22, 2017.

Why Aren’t People Estate Planning?

Just under half of people say they just haven’t “gotten around to” estate planning yet. Unfortunately, the families and loved ones of those people may be in a tough spot sorting through their estate in the end.

Another 7% of people aren’t sure who to assign assets to and an additional 4% don’t know how to create an estate plan – both of which are processes a lawyer can help you with.

When Should I Update (Or Start) My Estate Plan?

If you’ve had any of the following life changes, you should update or create your estate plan:

  • significant time has passed since your last update (a few years);
  • marriage, divorce, remarriage or unmarried commitment;
  • birth or adoption of a child or grandchild;
  • child has reached the age of majority (18 in Minnesota);
  • the death of a member of your immediate family;
  • you recently moved to Minnesota or if you move to another state or country; or
  • you’ve changed your mind about your previous will or estate plan.

News & Events

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